Asa Hutchinson urges Iowans to donate to campaign so he makes GOP debate stage

Republican presidential candidate Asa Hutchinson wants to be on stage during the first Republican National Committee primary debate in August.

But first, he has to earn it.

Hutchinson — along with all Republican candidates — must vote 1% or higher in a number of polls and have a minimum of 40,000 unique donors, with at least 200 individual donors from 20 different states, according to an RNC statement Friday.

The latest demands set by the committee come amid a growing field of promising Republican candidates, with more announcements expected next week.

During his final visit to Iowa, Republican presidential candidate Asa Hutchinson speaks to Roberto and Karen Dubiel during a town hall with the Story County GOP at the Mid-States Companies on Thursday, June 1, 2023.

During his final visit to Iowa, Republican presidential candidate Asa Hutchinson speaks to Roberto and Karen Dubiel during a town hall with the Story County GOP at the Mid-States Companies on Thursday, June 1, 2023.

Hutchinson said he felt confident he would hit the 1% voting threshold, but called on potential voters to donate to his campaign at a town hall on Thursday when he last visited Iowa. ahead of U.S. Senator Joni Ernst’s annual Roast and Ride.

“I want to be on the debate stage in August,” the former Arkansas governor told a group of about 30 people gathered at the Mid-States Companies office in Nevada, Iowa. “We will get there, but we need your help. $1 account. $5 counts. »

The new criteria for the upcoming debate reflect a different approach to the GOP debate hosted by Fox in August 2015. That debate was split in two, with a prime-time debate for 10 candidates with the highest score in a set of polls and a precedent. one for those who didn’t make the top ten.

Republican candidates will also be required to sign a loyalty pledge requiring candidates to endorse the eventual GOP presidential nominee if they wish to participate in the 2024 debates, RNC Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel told “State of the Union” from CNN in February.

2024 Iowa Caucuses: Where and when do presidential candidates visit Iowa?

“The RNC is committed to a fair, neutral and transparent primary process and the qualification criteria set out will place our party and our eventual nominee in the best position to retake the White House in November 2024,” McDaniel said in the press release. outlining the criteria for the first primary debate in Milwaukee on August 23.

On Thursday, Hutchinson shared his aversion to donation requirements, saying he prioritized spending money instead of emphasizing a candidate’s strengths.

“That’s too high a threshold. It’s the duty of Iowa voters to narrow the field and they’re doing a good job,” he told the Register. He declined to comment on the number of donations he has received so far.

Ray Dearin, of Ames, told The Register on Tuesday night that while he’s not sure 40,000 donations is fair, he agreed there has to be a way to limit the number of applicants.

“I hope he makes it. I’m still not sure about 40,000,” Dearin said. But “you have to set the line somewhere”.

During his final visit to Iowa, Republican presidential candidate Asa Hutchinson addresses potential voters during a town hall with the Story County GOP at the Mid-States Companies on Thursday, June 1, 2023.

During his final visit to Iowa, Republican presidential candidate Asa Hutchinson addresses potential voters during a town hall with the Story County GOP at the Mid-States Companies on Thursday, June 1, 2023.

Hutchinson told attendees about his top priorities should he take office, including cutting “excessive” federal spending, increasing energy production in the United States, securing the southern border and protecting values ​​such as families and “individual life”.

He also joked about the sudden popularity of the “non-Trump path” – a view that there is a need for “different leadership” – a path he says has worked on its own for a long time.

More: Donald Trump says ‘there’s no way we’re losing Iowa’ as he hits Ron DeSantis in Des Moines

“It’s not loneliness anymore,” he said, pointing to a number of Republicans about to announce their presidential candidacies. “What does that say to you? It says our party leaders say…we need to have different leadership.”

Virginia Barreda is the Des Moines city government reporter for the Register. She can be contacted at vbarreda@dmreg.com. Follow her on Twitter at @vbarreda2.

This article originally appeared on USATNetwork: Asa Hutchinson asks Iowans for campaign donation to reach debate stage

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